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El VIH o su tratamiento tienen un efecto protector contra la esclerosis múltiple

alexiustoday:

Un equipo médico australiano e investigadores británicos analizaron los registros médicos de más de 5 millones de personas y ha descubierto que, o bien el VIH o medicamentos contra el VIH tienen un efecto protector contra la esclerosis múltiple (EM). Pacientes con SIDA o personas con VIH que reciben tratamiento tienen una probabilidad del 60% menos de probabilidades de recibir un diagnóstico de EM. La investigación fue publicada el 4 agosto de 2014  en el Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry.

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Un análisis más profundo ha descubierto que aquellos con un régimen de tratamiento más largo, por 5 años o más, tenían un 80% menos de probabilidad de desarrollar EM. El descubrimiento es notable por el hecho de que no existen tratamientos curativos o preventivos para la EM y esta visión inesperada puede ser una de las vías más interesantes.

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CANCER TREATMENT CLEARS TWO AUSTRALIAN PATIENTS OF HIV

Researchers have discovered that two HIV+ Australian men who were treated with stem cell transplant for cancer — one for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and the other for leukaemia — have become virus-free, presumably because the donor cells carried genes that confer immunity from it.
hey are still on antiretroviral therapy (ART) “as a precaution”, but those drugs alone could not be responsible for bringing the virus to such low levels, says David Cooper, director of the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, who led the discovery. A year ago, a different group of researchers had reported cases with a similar outcome.
Cooper presented details of the cases today at a press briefing in Melbourne, Australia, where delegates are convening for next week’s 20th International AIDS Conference. The announcement came just a day after the news that at least six people heading to the conference died when a Malaysia Airlines flight was shot down in Ukraine.

The HIV virus (yellow particles), seen on a white blood cell in this scanning electron micrograph. by Thomas Deernick, NCMIR

CANCER TREATMENT CLEARS TWO AUSTRALIAN PATIENTS OF HIV

Researchers have discovered that two HIV+ Australian men who were treated with stem cell transplant for cancer — one for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and the other for leukaemia — have become virus-free, presumably because the donor cells carried genes that confer immunity from it.

hey are still on antiretroviral therapy (ART) “as a precaution”, but those drugs alone could not be responsible for bringing the virus to such low levels, says David Cooper, director of the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, who led the discovery. A year ago, a different group of researchers had reported cases with a similar outcome.

Cooper presented details of the cases today at a press briefing in Melbourne, Australia, where delegates are convening for next week’s 20th International AIDS Conference. The announcement came just a day after the news that at least six people heading to the conference died when a Malaysia Airlines flight was shot down in Ukraine.

  • The HIV virus (yellow particles), seen on a white blood cell in this scanning electron micrograph. by Thomas Deernick, NCMIR

NEW GEL AS POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TOOLS IN HIV INHIBITION

One of the most anticipated tools in preventing HIV are microbicide gels. Now researchers at the University of Alcalá and the Gregorio Marañón Hospital in Madrid have achieved demonstrate their efficacy in rodents. Foul try it in other animal species and, if the results are positive, would enter the human trial phase.

The active substance is a dendrimer 2G-S16, a type of nanoscopic molecule that blocks infection of epithelial cells and the immune system against HIV. The virus has a protein recognizes a receptor on the cell membrane to fuse with it and begin the infection process. The dendrimer blocks such proteins, preventing the entry of the virus into cells.

The gel is nontoxic and after application may have efficacy in protecting against HIV between 18 and 24 hours, during which they could have sex without contagion. Besides inhibiting the virus and halt its spread, one of the added values ​​of the product is that it has anti-inflammatory properties, preventing the arrival of cells can be infected at the focus of inflammation, thus reducing the possibility of HIV infection. Furthermore, the gel does not alter the vaginal flora, no irritation and no altering sperm motility and therefore would not affect fertility.

explore-blog

There is some evidence that meditation boosts the immune response in vaccine recipients and people with cancer, protects against a relapse in major depression, soothes skin conditions and even slows the progression of HIV. Meditation might even slow the aging process. Telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes, get shorter every time a cell divides and so play a role in aging. Clifford Saron of the Center for Mind and Brain at the University of California, Davis, and colleagues showed in 2011 that levels of an enzyme that builds up telomeres were higher in people who attended a three-month meditation retreat than in a control group.

As with social interaction, meditation probably works largely by influencing stress response pathways. People who meditate have lower cortisol levels, and one study showed they have changes in their amygdala, a brain area involved in fear and the response to threat.

Fascinating read on the science behind how our minds affect our bodies, from loneliness to optimism to meditation (via explore-blog)